The B Side Poems: A Review of Blue Laws by Kevin Young

With over nine collections of poetry, Kevin Young is by far one of the most instrumental poets of our time. He is instrumental because of his musical attention to poetry. Lucille Clifton describes the Harvard graduate’s earliest collection Most Way Home (2005) as, “an inner history which is compelling and authentic and American.” His collection To Repel … More The B Side Poems: A Review of Blue Laws by Kevin Young

A House of Legacy, Any Way You Can: A Review of The Bricks That Built the Houses

“In seven days he turns twenty-seven. That’s the age that rock stars die at. If he died at twenty-seven, he would leave nothing behind him. No legacy. Nothing of note. Nothing to separate him in any way from the countless other bodies that he’s spent his life amongst.” In many ways, Kate Tempest’s novel The … More A House of Legacy, Any Way You Can: A Review of The Bricks That Built the Houses

Follow the Rhizome: An Interview with Hari Alluri Part 1

  This is part one of an interview conducted by the The B-Side journal’s Arthur Kayzakian with poet Hari Alluri on how sound enters his poetry. The discussion encompasses his poetics, use of craft in regards to sound, his chapbook The Promise of Rust, and his forthcoming book The Flayed City.    What does it mean to be a … More Follow the Rhizome: An Interview with Hari Alluri Part 1

Blood At The Root: A Review of A Play Produced By the SDSU School of Theatre, Television & Film

From the very first moment the guests walked into the Experimental Theatre of San Diego State University, everyone knew that the following performance would be closely connected to music. While finding their seats, the audience was greeted with various hip hop and R&B songs to get them in the mood (which visibly worked well) for … More Blood At The Root: A Review of A Play Produced By the SDSU School of Theatre, Television & Film

All You Need is Drums to Start a Poetry Party: Piebald at the Soda Bar

I’m posted up next to a row of broken down arcade machines, leaning against a Battletoads cabinet with a faded screen. The crowd, one of the larger ones I’ve seen at the Soda Bar, is milling around close to the stage, or wandering back and forth to the bar, balancing drinks as they squeeze between … More All You Need is Drums to Start a Poetry Party: Piebald at the Soda Bar

This is Called Culture: A Review of The Incantations of Daniel Johnston

Beware: I don’t think you should read this. I’m warning you.      No, those aren’t my words. That isn’t the opening statement for my review. Rather, it’s the sole text of the first page to the graphic novel The Incantations of Daniel Johnston, illustrated by Ricardo Cavolo and written by Scott McClanahan. The black text, … More This is Called Culture: A Review of The Incantations of Daniel Johnston

Where Film, Music, and Writing Meet: An Interview with Craig Oliver

Craig Oliver owns and operates Volar Records, an independent record label, out of his apartment in Golden Hill, San Diego. The label has released bands such as the Fresh & Onlys, Beaters, and many more. However, his interests reach beyond music. A graduate from the San Diego State University film program, he is an avid … More Where Film, Music, and Writing Meet: An Interview with Craig Oliver

The World’s Sexiest Hobos: A Review of Your Favorite Band is Killing Me by Steven Hyden

As someone who has, sadly enough, never taken a breath in a world with a vitally alive Kurt Cobain, I almost felt like a hypocrite when I first opened Steven Hyden’s latest work, Your Favorite Band is Killing Me. I mostly just wasn’t in the age to consciously and actively experience the many rivalries the … More The World’s Sexiest Hobos: A Review of Your Favorite Band is Killing Me by Steven Hyden